spring in paris / part I

Since our move I have been hoping and planning for a long weekend in Paris. I’ve saved the names and locations of restaurants, shops, bakeries (and more bakeries), and planned returns to some of the landmarks for years. Given the sheer volume of places on my list I would need to move there in order to see all the sights.

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Two Fridays ago we finally took the evening train to Paris for nearly 4 days of exploration. Our itinerary was outlined on a custom google map polka-dotted with points of interest that I had added over the past few weeks. My map focused on possible restaurants and bakeries (many recommended by my favorite Paris-based food writer David Lebovitz) and lots of shops to browse.

Overall, we had a wonderful trip. Only our feet disagree. It was nice to introduce Martin to the city and despite my rigorous itinerary we made time so he could to train twice, and window shop every chocolate and tea shop. Our goal was see some Paris landmarks, but also enjoy just wandering the streets and tasting new treats.

DAY ONE

Our hotel was located in the Latin Quarter not too far from Notre Dame so after fueling up on some delicious croissants and coffee at the delicious Eric Kayser bakery on Rue Monge (a Lebovitz recommendation) we spent the first day walking around the old town. We had planned to get a few of the tourist destinations out of the way and not spend time every day waiting in lines. We purchased a Paris Museum Pass (a serious deal, even if you visit only a few sites) and started with Sainte Chapelle, Place Dauphine, Notre Dame, and the long climb up the towers to look down on the city as the gargoyles do. Last time I was in Paris as a teenager Notre Dame was covered being restored so it was nice to see it free of scaffolding. It was windy and chilly and yet the perfect temperature for walking outside without getting too warm. Then we spent the afternoon visiting the Impressionists at the Musee d’Orsay. The day was finished with some delicious Mexican food at Candelaria, a tiny hole-in-wall place (another Lebovitz recommendation).

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